atomic-flash:

Pax, sax, sarax; hola, noa, nostra! - ka-bala, the 1967 talking board game from the Transogram Company.

atomic-flash:

Pax, sax, sarax; hola, noa, nostra! - ka-bala, the 1967 talking board game from the Transogram Company.

(Source: hierarchical-aestheticism)

sayonarababy:

ANARCHY / Shake Dat Ass feat. AISHA

Uhh, I feel the same way about this that I did about the new KOHH song: why are these guys I thought were lame making songs that I actually like?

this is cheap and nasty and i flippin love it

(Source: j-urban)

minimoonstar:

wank-stains:

rickytee:

There is a deep meaning to this

Reblogged by tumblr.viewer

Is this the full set, now? XD

Fun fact: Penguin have threatened to have the books of this Ladybird parody pulped!
(I’m fairly sure i’ve also recently seen giant Ladybird-pastiche paintings by… someone who is not Miriam Elia (or the artist who did the ‘ladybord book of policing’ a while back) but haven’t found the search terms necessary to confirm)

(Source: ratak-monodosico)

clawfoottub:

theacheofmodernism:

GUYS I CAN’T STOP LAUGHING

That is so adorable.


I love this kid. This kid has heard your “I should have been born in the 1960s” and this kid has RAISED YOU. This kid is a great bearer of human truth and we should be grateful for their existence, even if it is in the wrong era.

clawfoottub:

theacheofmodernism:

GUYS I CAN’T STOP LAUGHING

That is so adorable.

I love this kid. This kid has heard your “I should have been born in the 1960s” and this kid has RAISED YOU. This kid is a great bearer of human truth and we should be grateful for their existence, even if it is in the wrong era.

aintgotnoladytronblues:

todf:

blackpaint20:

An Incomplete History of the Art of Funerary Violin Hardcover
by Rohan Kriwaczek
During the Protestant revolution in Europe, a new kind of music emerged, one that ultimately sought to recognize the deceased and to individuate the sense of loss and grief. But the tradition was virtually wiped out by the Great Funerary Purges of the 1830s and 40s. Kriwaczek tells the fascinating story of this beautiful music, condemned by the Catholic Church for political as much as theological reasons, and of the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists that, yes, defends its secrets in our time. This is unquestionably one of the strangest books any publisher has ever risked publishing. Discussing the evolution of European culture, musical forms and society’s changing attitudes to mortality and the emotional effects of music upon the soul, this is a dark and magical history. - source

Worth owning, for sure.

someone had some fun with a blurb.
"the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists" is one of those magical copy-writer turns of phrase where i’m pretty sure everyone with an unusual love of words would murder their firstborn if it meant we could call those up on command.


i would read comics if the heroes had to face that terrifying enemy, “the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists”.

aintgotnoladytronblues:

todf:

blackpaint20:

An Incomplete History of the Art of Funerary Violin Hardcover

by Rohan Kriwaczek

During the Protestant revolution in Europe, a new kind of music emerged, one that ultimately sought to recognize the deceased and to individuate the sense of loss and grief. But the tradition was virtually wiped out by the Great Funerary Purges of the 1830s and 40s. Kriwaczek tells the fascinating story of this beautiful music, condemned by the Catholic Church for political as much as theological reasons, and of the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists that, yes, defends its secrets in our time. This is unquestionably one of the strangest books any publisher has ever risked publishing. Discussing the evolution of European culture, musical forms and society’s changing attitudes to mortality and the emotional effects of music upon the soul, this is a dark and magical history. - source

Worth owning, for sure.

someone had some fun with a blurb.

"the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists" is one of those magical copy-writer turns of phrase where i’m pretty sure everyone with an unusual love of words would murder their firstborn if it meant we could call those up on command.

i would read comics if the heroes had to face that terrifying enemy, “the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists”.

limb-of-satan:

favorite parts from the Hateful Things section of Sei Shonagon’s Pillow Book

thevidsarealright:

The Singles Jukebox is seeking writers!

thesinglesjukebox:

The Singles Jukebox is seeking writers! We’re looking for anyone who is unafraid to tackle unfamiliar genres, open to analyzing new sounds, and — most importantly — possesses a unique voice. We are not a Pitchfork or a Rolling Stone; we are an international site that thrives on diverse voices and and opinions. We are particularly interested in applicants who are under-represented in music writing and strongly encourage women and people of color to apply. However, all are welcome, including those who have previously expressed interest in writing for the website….

Heads up dudes!

PWC14 Third-Place Match: Chile v Iran

tomewing:

YES we are actually finishing the Pop World Cup.

YES it is the game that never gets any votes.

BUT it will this time because both Chile and Iran have been awesome.

tomewing:

“Guess what? When people are surrounded by fear-mongering news media, they get anxious. They fear the wrong things. Moral panics emerge. And yet, we as a society believe that it’s totally acceptable for news media – and its click bait brethren – to manipulate people’s emotions through the headlines they produce and the content they cover. And we generally accept that algorithmic curators are perfectly well within their right to prioritize that heavily clicked content over others, regardless of the psychological toll on individuals or the society. What makes their practice different? (Other than the fact that the media wouldn’t hold itself accountable for its own manipulative practices…) Somehow, shrugging our shoulders and saying that we promoted content because it was popular is acceptable because those actors don’t voice that their intention is to manipulate your emotions so that you keep viewing their reporting and advertisements. And it’s also acceptable to manipulate people for advertising because that’s just business. But when researchers admit that they’re trying to learn if they can manipulate people’s emotions, they’re shunned. What this suggests is that the practice is acceptable, but admitting the intention and being transparent about the process is not.”

danah boyd unsurprisingly has some really interesting things to say the Facebook PsyOps brouhaha - http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/archives/2014/07/01/facebook-experiment.html

This is an interesting point not because it points out that we live in a society full of emotional manipulators (noes!) but because it helps frame things partly as “who in society has our tacit permission to manipulate emotions and who doesn’t?” - and there’s a spectrum, with TV drama and pop songs at one end (where manipulation is welcomed and the only sin is to be too corny) and Facebook apparently at the other. And I’m pretty sure part of what determines your place on the spectrum is how savvy people reckon they are to it, how much they feel they could resist (if they wanted).

I have a similar facebook experience to danah boyd - I don’t like it, and only open it intermittently when e.g. the emails that tell me i have notifications get too annoying, or i need to check the time or place for an event i’m invited to on there. And so I have the same algorithmic garbage issue that she has, a feed that’s always meaningless.

This I thought was a key quote -

Of course, a huge part of what’s at stake has to do with the fact that what counts as a contract legally is not the same as consent. Most people haven’t consented to all of Facebook’s terms of service. They’ve agreed to a contract because they feel as though they have no other choice.

I’m reminded of Janet Vertesi’s attempt to hide her pregnancy from Big Data (the data on pregnant women being some of of the most lucrative for marketers) - how much hard work it was, how inconvenient it made everything. And how people didn’t realise that when she said “please don’t mention it on facebook” she meant facebook messages and fb chat as well as the facebook wall. That people feel like fb-as-data-collector is at the level of a friend who can read your wall, not at the level of the platform that can read everything written on it, even the “private” stuff.

I’m also reminded of some of the pieces on online-and-offline harrassment recently that point out that for a person who makes her living as a writer on the internet, twitter is not only a social space but part of her work practice. The advice to “just shut your twitter account down” is saying: cut yourself off from socialisation, cut yourself off from a means of promoting the work you do to get by.

It’s completely possible to live without Facebook, or without Google, or without various kinds of social media (Vertesi’s very interesting, in that interview, on how her strategy is to decentralise so that no one company can hold complete information) — but for a lot of people it’s hard work, it’s inconvenient, it’s more expensive in terms of money or time. So we entrust not only our data but our social interaction to a company whose obligation to their shareholders is to make more money every quarter. And when we’re reminded of the bad bargain we made our thoughts revolt against it.

Random Aesthethic Generator

stopmoving:

katherinestasaph:

fionagallagherrr:

so i did a thing
(edit to remove a whole bunch of other people’s notes)

drunk leather summer chic

um

90’s fantasy demon crab

i am more seapunk than you or anyone

WAIT so i just put my irl first name in and got

40’s robot time-traveling anti-hero

which isn’t so much a “random aesthetic” as the actual aesthetic of my dashboard since captain america: the winter soldier came out, so i’m taking that one.