beatonna:

is good bear

beatonna:

is good bear

(Source: groeneinkt)

blackmagicalgirlmisandry:

quickweaves:

The kid in the blue grew up to become iconic femme queen face iconic femme queen performer and Legendary Mother of the house of Laperla, Alyssa Laperla

(x) here’s a video of her from 2011, this makes me so unbelievably happy because I always feared the worst had happened to them 

blackmagicalgirlmisandry:

quickweaves:

The kid in the blue grew up to become iconic femme queen face iconic femme queen performer and Legendary Mother of the house of Laperla, Alyssa Laperla

(x) here’s a video of her from 2011, this makes me so unbelievably happy because I always feared the worst had happened to them 

(Source: highkeygay)

Five Years of the Singles Jukebox

thesinglesjukebox:

We’re not usually big on self-aggrandisement or mythologising. More or less, we just do one thing — we rate pop songs out of ten — but we love it and we do it well. We don’t pay attention to the consensus around us; we build our own (sometimes, but we often disagree). And we’ve now been doing it for five years.

Of course the story of the Jukebox goes back further than that. We started as a pair of columns on Stylus, one for UK singles and one for US singles, which ran until the site closed in 2007. A chance meeting between two writers in a pub led to a few emails going across the globe, and all of a sudden the band was back together, just like we’d never split up. Sure, our friends at Pitchfork began to focus on individual tracks in earnest a month earlier, stealing our thunder somewhat, but we’ll always have the extra decimal place.

In the last five years, there have been nearly 3400 songs covered from over 60 countries, with about 30,000 individual paragraph-long reviews from us adding up to about 2,000,000 (two million) words. It’d take you a week solid to read the site from front to back. We don’t recommend you do that, so here are some highlights from our first five years. Feel free to share your own in the comments!

Here’s to another five just like these.

Read More

singles jukebox 5eva tbh

isomorphismes:

Literally a fusion reactor.


Nicole Krauss, The History of Love
Nicole Krauss, The History of Love

(Source: ne0ntigress)

minimoonstar:

katherinestasaph:

aintgotnoladytronblues:

writersnoonereads:

Arkady and Boris Strugatsky are probably the most famous Soviet-era science-fiction writers, but only recently have any of their numerous books come back into print in the US: Chicago Review Press published a new translation of Roadside Picnic (the basis for Tarkovsky’s Stalker) in 2012 and Melville House just published Definitely Maybe (translated by Antonina Bouis). CRP will also publish Hard to Be a God in June.

These scans come from the 50 Watts hoard except for the top 1979 Penguin (art by Adrian Chesterman) courtesy of David/qualityapemanRichard M. Powers illustrated the bottom Roadside Picnic and the four other covers in that style.

i’ve read enough of them (exploiting the used-bookstore market to satisfy my insatiable curiosity) to know they’re way more influential (especially on the science fictional approaches that developed outside the united states’ mainstream) than their current obscurity would allow most casual observers - and many who wouldn’t think of themselves as “casual” at all - to ever recognize.

i really support the effort of everyone working to get them back in print. it’s a funny thing how you don’t realize how much of a gaping hole in your heart/head a lack of history can create until, suddenly, what ought to have been there all along gets handed back to you.

bolding mine; I’ve never seen this put so succinctly.

Wow, Theodore Sturgeon was on a one-man mission, there.

Optimism

tomewing:

With all the “Poptimism” talk around this weekend I was thinking a bit about what I was hoping for from ILM (I Love Music) when I set it up, and from New York London Paris Munich back when I did that. In many ways ILM didn’t work, but there was one particular aim I think is laudable (and was somewhat misunderstood). In consideration for those who are - unimaginably! - tired of meta-criticism and “what should music writing be” pieces, I have put this under a cut.

Read More

Soundmap of London canals and minor rivers
americancaptaincomic:

New Library Card. 

have i proselytised at you recently about “Steve Rogers’ AMERICAN CAPTAIN”? because everything about it is delightful. It answers a very important cultural question, viz: what if Steve Rogers decided to write an autobiographical indie comic about how unsuccessful he was at “acclimatising” to the modern era and how awkward and angry he felt all the time. I had no idea this was a question whose answer I was invested in until I started reading.

As yet, no spoilers for That Film, so you basically have no reason not to read it right away (SRAC is up there among the reactions i am most looking forward to, though).

americancaptaincomic:

New Library Card. 

have i proselytised at you recently about “Steve Rogers’ AMERICAN CAPTAIN”? because everything about it is delightful. It answers a very important cultural question, viz: what if Steve Rogers decided to write an autobiographical indie comic about how unsuccessful he was at “acclimatising” to the modern era and how awkward and angry he felt all the time. I had no idea this was a question whose answer I was invested in until I started reading.

As yet, no spoilers for That Film, so you basically have no reason not to read it right away (SRAC is up there among the reactions i am most looking forward to, though).

katherinestasaph:

“Jeff Mills: [In the Sixties and Seventies, science fiction] was everywhere. NASA was active at that time. There had been a few really successful movies like 2001. It was an industry that was very much embedded into the American psyche, or already ingrained.” RA: Do you think all that sci-fi stuff had an element of escapism that was particularly appealing to the situation of growing up in Detroit? Mills: I think it was pretty much all over the country. I found an encyclopedia of science fiction writers from pulp fiction all the way to comics. [It said] where the people were from. If you look at that you see that it was very much in the Midwest, a few on the West Coast, of course—in San Francisco, northern California. Many in New Jersey, many in New York; some in Boston; and a few spread out in other places. Some were women disguising themselves as men so they could get their stories published. America has a very interesting background for fantasy/science fiction writing. These weren’t their primary jobs. They were accountants; they were waitresses; they were people from all sectors of the workforce. They had the opportunity to write these stories because this is what they felt they were contributing to in terms of the future, I suppose. This has been going on for quite some time. If you go back and look at the history of science fiction writing, it’s been a hundred years of constant accumulation of writings about and projections about the future and space and humans’ relationship to it. By the Sixties and Seventies it had really been manifesting in Americans. Most of these magazines and periodicals were read while people were catching the train, or in transit in cities—big hubs like Chicago had a large amount of readers. Detroit also was a big hub for trains and that type of rail travel. Those places had the most active readers, which could explain why comics are so popular in Chicago. There’s a very strong connection between this genre and our American societies.”

RA Exchange: EX.192 Jeff Mills (Resident Advisor)

(Source: theundergroundismassive)